Track and Field Training Tips

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What is the single best stretch for track and field athletes?

If You Only Do One Stretch, Make it a Calf Stretch

If there is one stretch that no athlete should be without, it's probably a calf stretch. Tight calves have been implicated in several common sports ailments, such as plantar fasciitis, but they also can contribute to muscle imbalances that lead to more serious injuries. Try this great way to stretch both calves at once:
Stand with the balls of your feet on the step and hold onto a wall or railing for balance. Slowly lower your heels. Hold for a count of five, and slowly raise them. Repeat 3 times. You can do this stretch as part of a pre-workout warmup or post-workout cool-down. Stop if you feel pain or discomfort.

   
What is the best way to put ice on an injury?

Ice, Ice, With Veggies

Any track and field athletes get hurt now and then. For post-workout muscle strains, keep a few bags of frozen peas or corn in the freezer. They easily shape to fit around a knee, elbow, or ankle, and can be secured in place with an ace bandage if needed. Keep ice packs in place for about 15 minutes, and then return them to the freezer until after your next workout.
Caveat: Make sure to mark the bags or remember which frozen veggies are your ice packs and don't eat them! Repeated thawing and refreezing render the veggies unfit for eating, but as ice packs they can last for months, or until the bag breaks.

   
What is interval training?

Catch Me If You Can

Lactic Acid. It's a runner's worst enemy. It's that pain you get in your legs when you are nearing the end of your race. Lactic Acid is a bi-product of your muscles burning energy to keep you moving forward, and making your legs feel like anchors in the process.

One way to train your legs to better deal with the problem is through interval training. Interval training consists of running a certain distance or time, and then repeating it multiple times, with a predetermined amount of rest in between. It is a great way to become a better runner, and lower your race times!

   
What is the single best stretch for track and field athletes?

If You Only Do One Stretch, Make it a Calf Stretch

If there is one stretch that no athlete should be without, it's probably a calf stretch. Tight calves have been implicated in several common sports ailments, such as plantar fasciitis, but they also can contribute to muscle imbalances that lead to more serious injuries. Try this great way to stretch both calves at once:
Stand with the balls of your feet on the step and hold onto a wall or railing for balance. Slowly lower your heels. Hold for a count of five, and slowly raise them. Repeat 3 times. You can do this stretch as part of a pre-workout warmup or post-workout cool-down. Stop if you feel pain or discomfort.

   
What does sprint training consist of?

Run Fast

Have you ever wondered what it took to run fast? Power, speed and agility. Three traits that are essential to being fast, and being a good sprinter. Sprint training combines all three. The sprint races in track and field require an athlete to develop each of these traits in order to be successful, and be as fast as they can be.

   
What are speed and agility drills and what do they do for me?

It Started Long Ago

Remember that gym teacher you hated back in the sixth grade? Running in and out of cones, or back and forth between two lines carrying chalkboard erasers? I sure do. Y

ou might not have realized then that you were doing speed and agility drills. These drills, and others like them are great ways of improving your sprinting by developing speed, agility, and most importantly, explosiveness. This will allow you to get out of the blocks and down the track much faster.

   
Is there something different in training between distance and middle distance events?

There's Nothing "Mid" About It

Middle distance running involves a combination of speed and endurance. The races are usually too far for sprinters, but too fast for distance runners. Most of the races feel like an all out sprint, just covering a greater distance.

The runners who race these distances, need to have a great amount of running strength to compete in these events. Interval training is a great way to gain this type of strength. Interval training will build lactic acid buffers in your legs, allowing you to maintain the high speed over a greater distance.

   
Is there more to running that training on the roads and the track?

Mom said, "Go to Bed Early."

It is important to balance training with plenty of sleep and proper nutrition. Training hard for your event will get you most of the way to your goal, however you must remember to keep your body fresh by getting plenty of sleep and replenishing all of your lost nutrients with the correct foods and drinks.

Many runners develop problems with their bodies and blame it on their training, when the real cause of the problems is not enough of something in your diet or not enough sleep per day. A common issue with runners is amnemia, which is just the runner not eating enough iron in their daily diets. This problem is easily solved by changing eating behaviors and keeping an eye on proper nutrition

   
Which Track and Field event should I chose?

One Thing Leads to Another

There are many events in which to participate in track and field. Many events are similar, and many are not. Thus much of the training also varies, and at times is similar. When choosing which events to participate in should take, one should consider the track and field training involved.

The events can be placed in to a few groups. Sprinting, distance running, jumping, and throwing are a few of these groups. Choosing a group to concentrate on may allow the athlete to compete in more than one event, following only one type of training.

   
Hi, my name is Ebonie. I ran track in 6th grade thru 12th grade. I'm now considering becoming a high school track coach, but I'm really rusty. I don’t remember the all different terms and distances of the sport. I was wondering if you had a link or knowledge of a more in-depth guide to becoming a t

Resources for New High School Track & Field Coaches

A good first step for new or aspiring high school track & field coaches is to visit the National Federation of State High School Associations' website at www.nfhs.com. There you can order a copy of the latest “Track & Field Rules Book” for a minimal fee.

There are quite a few coaching guides available, including “The Athletics Congress's Track and Field Coaching Manual” by The Athletics Congress and Vern Gambetta and
“USA Track & Field Coaching Manual” by USA Track & Field and Joseph L. Rogers.

Two other coaching books with good reputations are “Coaching Track & Field Successfully” by Mark Guthrie and “Track & Field Coach's Survival Guide” by Edward Wallace, Jr.

   
What does it take to be a successful track and field athlete?

You Can't Fake It

The most important key to being a successful track and field athlete is training. Track and Field training prepares you for competition and consists of conditioning, strength training, and sprint and agility training. Every event has different training regimens and theories, and only through training, will you perform at your very best.

   
What is the best way to put ice on an injury?

Ice, Ice, With Veggies

Any track and field athletes get hurt now and then. For post-workout muscle strains, keep a few bags of frozen peas or corn in the freezer. They easily shape to fit around a knee, elbow, or ankle, and can be secured in place with an ace bandage if needed. Keep ice packs in place for about 15 minutes, and then return them to the freezer until after your next workout.
Caveat: Make sure to mark the bags or remember which frozen veggies are your ice packs and don't eat them! Repeated thawing and refreezing render the veggies unfit for eating, but as ice packs they can last for months, or until the bag breaks.

   
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